PlanPhilly

Look Up! A light Eyre design in Chestnut Hill

    • A courtyard is shared by the condominiums.
      A courtyard is shared by the condominiums.
    • A brick and shingle column welcomes visitors to The Anglecot, 401 E. Evergreen Ave.
      A brick and shingle column welcomes visitors to The Anglecot, 401 E. Evergreen Ave.
    • The front of the rambling estate sits at an angle to the streets.
      The front of the rambling estate sits at an angle to the streets.
    • A vertical sundial adorns the front facade.
      A vertical sundial adorns the front facade.
    • A decorative bay window breaks up the plane on the third level.
      A decorative bay window breaks up the plane on the third level.
    • An eyelid dormer blinks from the attic.
      An eyelid dormer blinks from the attic.
    • A corbelled chimney and shingle skin surround a third-floor balcony.
      A corbelled chimney and shingle skin surround a third-floor balcony.
    • The former carriagehouse was converted to condos.
      The former carriagehouse was converted to condos.
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“Look Up!” is a PlanPhilly feature that encourages appreciation of our architectural and historical environment. The photo essays focus on different Philadelphia areas and their distinctive building styles and details, all of which make up the physical fabric of the city and region.

The 25-year-old architect Wilson Eyre was still coming into his own style when he built the sprawling estate called The Anglecot in 1883.

The house was built for oil cloth and linoleum manufacturer Charles Adam Potter, and was named for the way the front sits at an angle to the intersection of Evergreen Avenue and Prospect Street in Chestnut Hill – an angled cottage, though hardly a cottage.

Anglecot was designed in the Queen Anne style, with a mix of materials and architectural details, but with a lighter mood than the Victorian Gothic homes of the period. Eyre’s designs moved toward Arts & Crafts, evident in the Mask and Wig Club, 311 S. Camac St., and combinations of European styles in the 1890s, including the Clarence Moore House, 1321 Locust St., and the Joseph Leidy House Office, 1319 Locust.

Anglecot was altered by Eyre in 1910, and renovated, subdivided, and converted to condominiums in 1983 by Greg Woodring and Associates.

It remains a beautifully preserved tribute to Eyre’s imaginative style. 

 

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Contact the writer at ajaffe@planphilly.com.



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About the author

Alan Jaffe, Historic preservation reporter

ajaffe@planphilly.com

B.A., Temple University

Alan Jaffe writes about historic preservation issues for PlanPhilly and focuses on often overlooked built landscapes in his column, “Look Up!” He
was a writer and editor in the newspaper industry for nearly 30 years, including eight at the Philadelphia Inquirer and nine at the South Jersey Courier-Post. He is currently the director of communications for the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society. He is also an antiques writer and collector and the author of “J. Chein & Co.: A Collector’s Guide to an American Toymaker.”


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