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You are viewing 6 articles for March 2019 concerning Traffic & Transportation

    • A pedestrian threads his way through snarled traffic at Broad and Chestnut streets. (Emma Lee/WHYY)

Is a crackdown on renegade drivers in Center City speeding up your commute?

Philadelphia commutes are getting faster thanks to a crackdown on cars stopped illegally in Center City bus lanes, according to city transportation officials. From September to January,  the enforcement push resulted…

    • Only 32 people signed into SEPTA's annual open house. (Kim Paynter/WHYY)

Why SEPTA’s annual open house drew fewer riders than your morning train

SEPTA averages close to 700,000 riders daily but attendance at the transportation authority’s annual open houses on Tuesday could barely fill a train car. SEPTA advertises the public forums as an…

    • A screenshot of the beta version homepage of SEPTA's new Key website. (PlanPhilly.)

‘Hip’ new SEPTA Key site is one of many fixes in the works

I barely remember what I did to open an account and register my SEPTA Key card on the agency’s newborn beta site. The interface was intuitive, quick and simple — nothing…

    • Mayor Jim Kenney and bicycle advocates in front of City Hall.

Kenney: Philly streets 'suck' but city making progress

“Suck” isn’t the usual verb mayors use to describe key elements of the city they govern. But that is exactly the word Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney recently chose when describing the…

    • Nicholas Baker fought to preserve Philadelphia's remaining cast-iron subway entrances, like this one at City Hall. (Emma Lee/WHYY)

Local man wins protections for Philly’s iconic cast-iron subway entrances

A decade after a local graduate student recommended preserving Philadelphia’s iconic cast-iron subway entrances, the Philadelphia Historical Commission approved protections for the ornate gates. That graduate student, Nicholas Baker, tried to…

    • Thousands of people travel between University City and Center City daily. | Emma Lee/WHYY

New breed of traffic cop could soon hit Philadelphia streets

If Philadelphia cops spent less time policing traffic, they could dedicate more energy to fighting the city’s soaring homicide rate. Or at least that’s the idea behind City Council President Darrell…

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