• Learn about the conditions that led to Frank Furness' most incredible masterworks, including the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts seen here, on Wednesday.
      Learn about the conditions that led to Frank Furness' most incredible masterworks, including the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts seen here, on Wednesday.

Ever wonder what it takes to wrap a SEPTA bus?

As part of its fifth annual "Stop Hunger at Your Station" campaign, SEPTA has wrapped its hybrid bus #8427 in a full-size food drive advertisement and released a time-lapse video of the process. 

Advertisements that wrap SEPTA buses have become increasingly popular. With its advertising vendor Titan 360, SEPTA is wrapping five to 10 buses each month. A single bus wrap can cost in the area of $10,000 and takes roughly six hours once the images are printed. Advertising rates vary depending on the number of vehicles wrapped, service routes and other factors. 

During the "Stop Hunger at Your Station" food drive, Oct. 7-21, SEPTA's own bus wrap advertisement will be touring the SEPTA service area, and to help promote the joint SEPTA and Philabundance hunger relief campaign, SEPTA has offered a behind the scenes glimpse of what it takes to wrap a bus. 

During the morning and evening rush hours, Oct. 7-21, the bus will be parked in high-traffic areas like City Hall and SEPTA headquarters. During off-peak hours the bus will travel on its regular service route. 

SEPTA hopes the bus will remind passengers to donate dry and canned foods to the marked barrels at more than 40 system locations. Last year "Stop Hunger at Your Station" collected 19 tons of food, an estimated 38,000 meals. 

To catch the wrapped bus at its first stop, celebrate the food drive launch at a special event with SEPTA, Philadbundance and city officials at City Hall, Friday, Oct. 4 at 11 a.m.

About the author

Christine Fisher, Transportation reporter

From 2012-2014 Christine covered transportation, writing about everything from pedestrian concerns to bicycle infrastructure, bridges, trail networks, public transit and more. Her favorite assignments sent her bushwhacking through Philadelphia’s yet-to-be-cleared bike trails, catching a glimpse of SEPTA’s inner workings or pounding the pavement to find out what pedestrians really think. Christine also covered community news for Eyes on the Street, where her work ranged from food sovereignty to public art and urban greening. She first joined PlanPhilly in fall 2011 as an intern through a partnership with Temple University’s Philadelphia Neighborhoods website. 


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