• Learn about the conditions that led to Frank Furness' most incredible masterworks, including the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts seen here, on Wednesday.
      Learn about the conditions that led to Frank Furness' most incredible masterworks, including the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts seen here, on Wednesday.

April 7: No strike, union negotiations continue | 20K volunteered Saturday | Philadelinquency's new delinquent tax totals | 37 displaced by fire | SEPTA bus crash | Reading Viaduct forges ahead

Welcome back to the work week, Eyes on the Street. Here's what's buzzing this Monday. 

Transportation Workers Union Local 234 did not strike today, after their contract expired Sunday night. Philadelphia Business Journal reports that SEPTA is offering two-year deal with a five percent wage increase. SEPTA and TWU are expected to resume negotiations Monday. 

Nearly 20,000 volunteers turned out for the 7th annual Philly Spring Cleanup Saturday. This year's trash collection totals are still coming in, but in the past six years, 45,000 volunteers have contributed more than 200,000 hours of cleaning and collected about 6.8 million pounds of trash. The 2008 collection day set the record for the largest single-day cleanup effort in the country. The Inquirer has more

According to Philadelinquency, the back taxes on delinquent properties in Philadelphia total more than $564 million. Philadelinquency calculated that figure with its new property search tool

More than 37 residents were displaced by a fire that tore through a senior living apartment complex in West Philadelphia Saturday. The fire broke out at Matthew's Manor, on North 57th Streets between Race and Vine, and the residents were being sheltered temporarily by the American Red Cross of Southeastern Pennsylvania. 

More than 20 people were injured when a car slammed into a Route 23 SEPTA bus heading north on 11th Street Friday evening. The Inquirer reports that the bus jumped a curb, knocked down a traffic light, hit three cars and scraped the side of a church before coming to a complete stop. Fortunately, no pedestrians were injured. 

After years of hardwork put in by local volunteers, the push to turn the Reading Viaduct into an elevated park appears "ready to bear fruit," writes the Inquirer's Troy Graham. The city has pledged $1.8 million over two years in capital funding, and the state has included $3.5 million from its Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program. The William Penn Foundation has pledged additional construction funding, but just how much is unclear.

The Buzz is Eyes on the Street’s morning news digest. Have a tip? 

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