• Learn about the conditions that led to Frank Furness' most incredible masterworks, including the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts seen here, on Wednesday.
      Learn about the conditions that led to Frank Furness' most incredible masterworks, including the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts seen here, on Wednesday.

May 6: 20 closed schools for sale | SEPTA crime down | Kensington Community Food Co-Op store | Doors & windows | Reviving alleys | $6.4 billion PHL expansion

Good morning Streeters. Here's what we're reading today:

The School District of Philadelphia will put 20 vacant schools on the market immediately, reports the Inquirer. The Philadelphia Industrial Development Corporation will manage the sales process for the District, holding open houses daily from May 19-June 2, and accepting bids continuously. Information about schools for sale can be found on PHLSchoolSales.com.

Overall crime dropped for the first time in a decade on SEPTA’s Broad Street Line and Market-Frankford El, the Inquirer reports. SEPTA police changed tactics, adding more cops at crime hot spots, using more cameras, and making arrests for smaller crimes in the hope of preventing larger ones. In the last year arrests for fare evasion and quality of life crimes went up. Last year 66% of reported crimes were phone thefts.

The Kensington Community Food Co-Op at last has a storefront space, 2672 Coral Street near the intersection of Frankford and Lehigh avenues, Grid reports. Founding board member Jeff Carpineta said they identified the building but weren’t in a position to buy it and “needed an angel to close a deal, and then two came—Mike and Sue Wade who had roots in the neighborhood and knew about the co-op. When they heard the need, they purchased the site to give the co-op a generous lease with an option to purchase. We cried when the deal closed.” Bonus: Because the space was formerly a bar the liquor license came with the deal so the co-op can operate a brewpub.

The LA Times checked in on Philly’s “doors and windows” anti-blight strategy, which tries to get ahead of the blight curve by compelling property owners to invest in upkeep. “That was the whole point, to catch them early, cite them for doors and windows, and hopefully that incentivizes the owner to come out of the woodwork and do something,” said L&I’s Rebecca Swanson.

Flying Kite explores how cities across America are reviving their alleys by giving them renewed public purpose from art to green streets.

After years of negotiation the Philadelphia International Airport has reached an agreement with Tinicum Township for a $6.4 billion expansion. The Business Journal reports that no residents will be displaced, a large point of contention, and that the project will be phased over the next 12-15 years.


The Buzz is Eyes on the Street’s morning news digest. Have a tip? 
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