• Learn about the conditions that led to Frank Furness' most incredible masterworks, including the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts seen here, on Wednesday.
      Learn about the conditions that led to Frank Furness' most incredible masterworks, including the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts seen here, on Wednesday.

Record riders used Broad Street Line for Broad Street Run

The Broad Street Line broke its Broad Street Run ridership record by nearly 2,000 riders Sunday, when 72,678 entries were recorded. 

The Broad Street Run's 40,000-plus runners are responsible for the jump in ridership, and photos on NewsWorks show just how crowded the trains were. 

SEPTA began recording ridership totals on the day of the Broad Street Run in 2002, when event-day rides totalled 39,919. Last year 70,871 Broad Street Line rides were recorded on the day of the race, and this year set the new record. 

In comparison, on an average Sunday, the Broad Street Line sees about 40,000 entries. 

SEPTA offered free subway rides to all runners, as long as they had their race bib, and in addition to transporting the crowds, SEPTA offered extra service, additional customer service, security and signage and "spring cleaning" at key stations like Olney Transportation Center. 

SEPTA Public Information Officer Manuel McDonnell Smith said SEPTA goes the extra mile for large events like the Broad Street Run, in part because they give SEPTA an opportunity to interact with customers who do not use the system on a daily basis. 


About the author

Christine Fisher, Transportation reporter

From 2012-2014 Christine covered transportation, writing about everything from pedestrian concerns to bicycle infrastructure, bridges, trail networks, public transit and more. Her favorite assignments sent her bushwhacking through Philadelphia’s yet-to-be-cleared bike trails, catching a glimpse of SEPTA’s inner workings or pounding the pavement to find out what pedestrians really think. Christine also covered community news for Eyes on the Street, where her work ranged from food sovereignty to public art and urban greening. She first joined PlanPhilly in fall 2011 as an intern through a partnership with Temple University’s Philadelphia Neighborhoods website. 


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