PlanPhilly

Public Space

    • Birds circle Mount Moriah Cemetery's historic gatehouse. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Mount Moriah cemetery could become nature sanctuary

On the edge of Philadelphia, Mount Moriah cemetery sprawls over 380 acres, spreading into Delaware County and sheltering 80,000 thousand graves. But when Paulette Rhone goes there to visit her husband’s…

    • Kickball in Weccacoe Playgorund. (Neal Santos for PlanPhilly)

In Common: Bethel Burying Ground memorial to advance in 2019, creating learning opportunity for the living at Weccacoe Playground

Our 2018 series about Philly's changing public spaces concludes in Queen Village where a new memorial is being developed to honor a historic black cemetery within a popular playground. It’s a…

    • Ontario and C streets is rated a “3” on Philadelphia’s Litter Index. (Kimberly Paynter/WHYY)

Philly’s dirtiest blocks get surveillance cameras as city steps up fight against illegal dumping

Surveillance cameras are coming to Philadelphia neighborhoods as part of a plan to make illegal dumpers pay for their trashy behavior. The Streets Department has installed 15 cameras on North Philadelphia…

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ABOUT PUBLIC SPACE

Public space includes everything from the sidewalk in front of your house, the road on which you drive to work, and the playground in which your child plays on the weekend.  Each of these spaces was designed to achieve specific functions, and some succeed while others fail.  Just like any other part of a city, many different factors explain the success of certain public spaces, and a lot of it is context-specific.  For example, why does Rittenhouse Square always appear to be more lively than Washington Square, even though they are of a very similar size and layout?  Why is Reading Terminal always busting at the seams with people when the Kimmel Center plaza remains empty at times when a show is not playing?  Why are streetscape improvements such as widened sidewalks and street trees the key to unlocking the potential of some commercial corridors and not others?  These questions and more are part of public space planning.

UPCOMING EVENTS IN PUBLIC SPACE

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